SOLOMON ISLANDS
Child Friendly School Development


2009 Workplan



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SO
SOLOMO
MON IS
ISLA
LANDS


Child Friendly Sc
School Developme
ment


“A school-aged child has a valid claim(right) to
education–others have duties(or obligations) to

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CONTENTS



1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Terms of Reference
1.2 Itinerary and Workshop

2. FINDINGS, ISSUES, RECOMMENDATIONS
2.1 Quality Framework within a Rights-based Approach
2.2 CFS Concept
2.3 Integration, Coordination, Reporting
2.4 Barriers to Education
2.5 Mapping Out-of-School Children
2.6 CFS Resource Package
2.7 Suporting CFS Development Priorities in Isabel
2.8 CFS Expansion to Choiseul and Western Provinces
2.9 Other Emerging Issues

3. CFS DEVELOPMENT 2009 WORKPLAN


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Attachments
Attachment 1 CFS Development Diagram
Attachment 2 Extracts from NEAP
Attachment 3 Workshop Program March 2009
Attachment 4 Contact List

Attachment 5 Key Documents
Attachment 6 Summary of Isabel SSA Priorities (November 2008)
Attachment 7 Support Needed– Links to existing Resources
Attachment 8 UNICEF Support to CFS 2009
Attachment 9 Presentation: School of Education SICHE
Attachment 10 Presentation: SI Curriculum Reform
Attachment 11 Quality Principles
Attachment 12 Quality Principles


A Rights-Based Approach
implies a people-centred
approach to development in
which outside support
should be catalytic and

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1.
Introduction

1.1

Terms of Reference
General
• Work with CFS steering teams in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands to consolidate and extend work with
School Self Assessment (SSA) processes.
• Support sorting and analyzing preliminary data with SSA and TOT preparation for School Development Plan
workshop with CFS steering committees in Solomon Islands
Solomon Is Specific
d. Discuss and roll out the 2008 Consolidation with steering committees.
e. 2009 Expansion plans discussed with CFS Coordinators and CFS Steering Committees, non-CFS and

MEHRD/MOE participants of workshops in all three countries.
f. Plans drawn for steering committees to map out of school children.
i. Provide support to UNICEF Field Office Education Officers, MOE, CFS Coordinators and steering teams in

Isabel Province to consolidate and extend work with School Self Assessment (SSA) processes

UNICEF 2009 Workplan CFS Activities to be included in Solomon Is Country Implementation Plans
included the following:-

Summary – Pacific CFS Development Activities 2009 (Kiribati, Solomons Is and Vanuatu)
CFS Conceptual
• CFS awareness workshop(s)
Framework, Indicators,• Development and/or consolidation of a Plan of Action for CFS Development,
Rubric
including Development of CFS Conceptual Framework / Indicators, CFS
School self assessment and CFS school development planning processes
and associated training workshops
School Self
• Consolidate and extend work with School Self Assessment (SSA) processes
Assessment
• Sorting and analysis of preliminary SSA data
School Improvement • Trainers for School Development Plan training prepared
Planning
• School Development Plan workshop conducted for all CFS and non-CFS
schools
• School Development Plan data collated and prioritised
Expansion
• CFS awareness workshops and field visits for representatives from other
provinces and MOE head-teachers and school inspectorate from other
provinces inducted to CFS
CFS Resource
• Child Friendly Schools training and resource package developed for teacher
Development
education use in teachers college and higher education colleges for field
based training and pre- and in-service use
• Training provided in use of Child Friendly Schools manuals and resources

A wide range of activities that will contribute to developing a ‘CFS-enabling environment’ are also included
in UNICEF’s 2009 Annual Workplan. (See following Attachment 8).




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1.2 Itinerary and Workshop

The CFS consultant made two brief visits to the Solomon Is to meet TOR objectives. A one-week
visit was made in November 2008 in order to participate in a School Self-Assessment Review
workshop in Isabel Province. As all relevant stakeholders were not available at this time, a follow-up
visit was made in the second week of March 20091. This visit included a 3 day CFS Planning
workshop in Honiara (see Attachment 4 for details), together with discussions with the Permanent
Secretary and Education Adviser MEHRD, and key CFS stakeholders from Isabel, Choiseul and
Western Provinces.

The remainder of this report summarises the outcomes of these workshops and discussions.




Bolitei Child-Friendly School Isabel Province

1 The timing was again limited due to the expiry of consultant contract.

2

2.
Key Findings, Issues, Recommendations
2.1
Quality Framework within Rights-based Approach
Human rights, particularly the rights of children and women, are fundamental to the work of UNICEF, which
is mandated to advocate for the protection of children’s rights, to help meet their basic needs and to
expand their opportunities to reach their full potential.” The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), is
UNICEF’s frame of reference. Furthermore, human rights principles guide UNICEF programming. These
principles include the four foundation principles of the CRC: non-discrimination; the right to life, survival and
development; the best interests of the child; and respect for the views of the child.

A Human Rights-based Approach (HRBAP) has specific requirements, namely:
a) identification of those groups whose rights are being denied and the factors contributing to the non-
realization of rights;
b) assessment of the capacity of ‘duty-bearers’ to assist in fulfilling the rights of targeted groups;
c) development and implementation of programs to build the capacity of rights-holders to claim their
rights, and of duty-bearers to fulfill their obligations.
d) monitoring and evaluation of both outcomes and processes guided by human rights principles and
commonly held understandings of good development practice. (See Attachment 1).
Accordingly, the development of a set of agreed ‘human-rights referenced’, good practice principles can
provide a framework for program planning, monitoring and evaluation.
Recommendation R1.
That the development of Child Friendly Schools in Solomon Islands explicitly pursue a ‘human-rights-

referenced, good development practice’ approach and that a set of Quality Principles be endorsed by
MEHRD and UNICEF; (refer Attachment 2)
That the agreed Quality Principles be referred when planning CFS development activities; their application

be monitored, progressively documented and finally evaluated.
2.2
CFS Concept
During the CFS Planning workshop and other consultations, it became apparent that different stakeholders
(national, provincial, local, government, non-government) have different understandings of ‘CFS’. Lack of
clarity can lead to cross-purposes in communication and resulting confusion. Within MEHRD, CFS still
appears to be regarded as a ‘project’, outside and additional to regular work, and possibly not affordable2.
There is need to continually work ensure stakeholders have a common understanding of what is meant by
CFS, to clarify which aspect is being referred. When we talk about ‘CFS’ we are referring to several
different things.
On the one hand, the term ‘CFS’ refers to a ‘child-friendly school’, which is typically characterised as:
child-seeking and inclusive (ensuring not only that children enrol, but attend regularly, participate actively,
complete primary with appropriate learning outcomes); with effective child-centred teaching and learning
processes; healthy, safe and protective programs; working in partnership with the community; facilitated by
effective leadership, planning, management processes in place; and creating a nurturing environment for
all.

2 If CFS contributes to effective, relevant education, on the one hand, and reduced repetition, on the other, then CFS is
contributing to efficiencies in the system which is more cost-effective in the long run. In the short-term, there are additional
development costs associated with introduction of the concept. Beyond that, the costs of CFS are the same as those of quality

education for all. ‘Affordability’ is not an option as the provision of quality education for all is an obligation.


3

These dimensions have been further defined by a set of indicators /standards for each, which provide a
framework for identification of ‘excluded children’, development of a set of ‘child-friendly’ strategies to
overcome constraints to education for these children, school ‘child-friendly’ assessment, school improvement
planning and monitoring of change.

A ‘CFS’ approach requires an ‘enabling environment’ which has implications for both the capacity building of
teachers, community members, provincial and national education officers and other partners; and also for the
development of CFS supportive MEHRD and provincial policy, planning, administrative and support systems.
The CFS indicators/standards can provide a guide for capacity assessment of individuals, policy, processes,
allowing the identification of capacity gaps and the development of a capacity building program and
associated resources. Thus, there is a set of activity at different levels, involving different stakeholders. An
integrated framework for CFS development has been established to map these different layers of CFS activity
(see below).

Whilst UNICEF is a key advocate for the realisation of every child’s right to education and a major contributor
to the development of the CFS model in Solomon Is, the development of child-friendly schools requires the
support of multiple partners. MEHRD is already contributing to creation of the enabling environment through,
for example, the curriculum reform process presently ongoing, which is founded on inclusive, relevant, child-
centred principles; the development and distribution of teaching/learning resources; and the reform of teacher
education; amongst other.

When referring to CFS, it is important to be clear what is meant. Are we referring to:
• the set of indicators which describe a child-friendly school?
• the school itself, which may have achieved ‘child-friendly status’ or be working towards ‘CF’ status);
• a particular activity within a school that is characteristic of one aspect of a CFS approach – ie. school
self-assessment; school-community mapping;
• the provision of capacity building support to a school, contributing to a targeted aspect of child-
friendliness (ie. training on school-mapping, or the supply of library resources, or latrines); or
• the development of a ‘CFS-enabling’ environment at national level (policy, pre-service training,
curriculum).
Recommendation R2.
That UNICEF support the consolidation of the CFS development process and capacity building
resources; demonstrating the effectiveness of the approach in terms of identifying, including, and

retaining hitherto excluded children.

Provincial CFS Development Process
• Establish Provincial Steering Committee
• Identify Potential Provincial CFS Resource Persons / Trainers
• Conduct Initial Awareness
• Map out-of-school children
• Establish CFS indicators and school self-assessment process
• Conduct school CFS self-assessment - Establish CFS development priorities
• Integrate CFS development priorities into SDPs
• Decide on establishment of CFS ‘Light-house’ Schools – clarify role vis-à-vis cluster schools
• Support CFS development as per priorities and resource availability
• Integrate CFS into provincial planning, data collection / storage, monitoring and inspection regimes
• Annual monitoring of change at school and student level

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CFS DEVELOPMENT MODEL

ALL SOLOMON ISLANDERS DEVELOP AS INDIVIDUALS AND POSSESS
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ATTITUDES NEEDED TO EARN A LIVING AND

TO LIVE IN HARMONY WITH OTHERS AND THE ENVIRONMENT


Increased: Net enrolment ratio
4. EQUITABLE ACCESS
Student attendance ratio
TO QUALITY BASIC
Completion Grade 6
EDUCATION FOR ALL
Learning Achievement literacy, numeracy & life skills
CHILDREN
Transition to Grade 7 and completion Grade 9
Reduced: Drop-out and repetition rates;

Gender disparity on all key indicators
Inclusive * Child-Centred * Relevant *
Teaching & Learning



3. CHILD-FRIENDLY
Monitoring
SCHOOL
Healthy, Safe, Protective
school
child-friendly
DEVELOPMENT
status
& results
for children
Inclusive * Child-Seeking *
Gender-responsive
Community
CFS Leadership,
Partnership & Support
Policy, Planning,
Management


CFS Principles
Ongoing
Stakeholder
integrated into
monitoring &

Capacities Built at
National & Provincial
evaluation of
School/Community
2 . CFS ENABLING
Education System &
CFS
Level:
CONDITIONS
Processes:
development
knowledge, skil s,
Policy, Plans, Teacher
process & results:
attitudes – to support
Training Curriculum,
Feedback of
CFS development
Resources, Assessment,
lessons learnt into
Inspections, Information,
continuous quality
Administrative Systems
improvement


Implementation of CFS Awareness & Capacity Building Program
1.2 IMPLEMENTATION OF
CFS CAPACITY BUILDING
STRATEGY: Training,

Awareness, Resources
CFS Conceptual Framework, Indicators, Standards
School-Community Mapping Out-of-School Children

School CFS Self-Assessment & Planning Process
1.1 CFS DEVELOPMENT
CFS Awareness & Resource Package
MODEL, STRATEGY &
Lighthouse School and School Cluster Support System
RESOURCES
CFS / MEHRD Integration Strategy


Monitoring, Evaluati5on, Reporting Framework


2.3 Integration,
Coordination, Reporting
Integration of CFS principles and processes within MEHRD is a priority. The Permanent Secretary indicated
that reviews of the National Education Action Plan (NEAP) (2007- 2009) and Provincial Education Action
Plans (PEAP) are planned for this year, prior to the development of a new NEAP (2010-2012) and PEAPs
(2010-2012). This presents an opportunity to review the extent to which NEAP and the PEAPs included child-
friendly principles and practices. A review of MEHRD’s Quality Assurance processes is planned for June.
There is a sense of MEHRD (planners) not being fully aware of the specifics of CFS development in Isabel.
Over the past year, regular progress reports submitted by the Isabel CFS coordinator to MEHRD, do not
appear to have been widely disseminated, reviewed, discussed or interpreted for their potential contribution
to mainstream MEHRD processes. The CFS school self-assessment (SSA) process, for example, is a
potentially valuable step in school development planning, which has gone unrecognised. MEHRD has just
spent millions of $$ on training teachers in every school in the country on the new School Development
Planning process. This was a ‘missed opportunity’ to integrate CFS SSA .

Recommendation R3: Integration, Coordination, Communication Strategy
That strategies be developed to strengthen the coordination and integration of CFS development activity
within regular MEHRD processes. This may include: the appointment of CFS Focal Person within MEHRD

(suggest this person be located within Planning Division), the establishment of a CFS Steering Committee,
review of CFS implications for MEHRD and identification of specific integration points (ie. SDPs, SIEMIS,

inspections, SOE, provincial plans, etc); the conduct of quarterly review meetings.
That UNICEF and MEHRD clarify communication, coordination and reporting procedures.

That CFS development activity is included in national and provincial annual workplans.
That CFS Coordinators participate in the MEHRD Quality Review.

2.4
Barriers to Education
The Education Adviser to MEHRD indicated the UNICEF-supported ‘ Barriers to Education Study’ is a priority
for 2009, on the side of the Ministry. It is noted in passing that the ‘school-community mapping of out of
school children’ exercise planned to be implemented in Isabel province and piloted in Choiseul and Western
in 2009, will produce some data similar to that anticipated by the barriers to education study, so coordination
of the two activities would be desirable to ensure maximising the benefits to accrue from both and avoiding
duplication. (See ‘Mapping Out-of-School Children’ below).
2.5
Mapping ‘Out of School’ Children
An activity that had previously been planned but not yet implemented, is ‘School-Community Mapping of
Out-of-School Children. The purpose of this activity is for schools, working with communities, to identify the
number of children (boys and girls) who have never enrolled in school or have dropped out, to identify the
contributing factors, and together to establish strategies to bring these children to school and to engage
them in actively in learning. This is critical activity in a rights-based approach.
It is anticipated that the school-community mapping will produce valuable insights into the extent and
nature of ‘exclusion’ from primary education, and identify pockets of need that may require a tailored
response. It will also provide useful direction for CFS manual development and information for purposes of
cross-checking the comprehensiveness of CFS indicators as capturing the key elements of a school that
will reverse exclusion.

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Recommendation R4: Mapping Out of School Children
That a planning workshop be conducted in June 2009 in Isabel, working with stakeholders to develop and
trial a school-community mapping strategy, tools, quality guideline and workplan, drawing on successful
experience from other countries.
That the Provincial Non-Formal Education Officer coordinate this activity and that a School Mapping
Facilitation Team be established.
That implementation proceed during July – August, and that a report be prepared to be presented at a
follow-up workshop in September. Note: There may be need to engage assistance in summarising the data.
2.6
CFS Resource Package
There is need to place greater emphasis on consolidation of the CFS development process, and
development of a CFS Resource Package. Already developed are: a set of CFS indicators/standards, a
school self-assessment process and tool. The indicators were developed in 2007 with the involvement of key
national level (MEHRD) stakeholders together with provincial, school and community level representatives in
Isabel province. The indicators and school self-assessment process was trialled in the lighthouse schools in
Isabel in 2007 and implemented in all schools in 2008.

Recommendation R5: Indicators, Standards and Types of Evidence
That a the CFS indicators, standards, types of evidence, school self assessment tool and process be
reviewed and further refined, with the involvement of SICHE, CDC staff, other relevant stakeholders, and
incorporating feedback from initial school mapping activities.
That the review of the SSA process consider:
• The involvement of at least ‘critical friend’ to verify the quality of the SSA process
• Collection of examples of ‘good practice’ for inclusion in the CFS Manuals –
• strategies to ensure active participation of children and community members, and to enhance validity
of assessments.
That a Provincial CFS SSA Summary Reporting template be developed.
Recommendation R6: CFS Resource Package
That key stakeholders meet to prepare a strategy and workplan for the development of a CFS Resource
Package in June 2009; giving consideration be given to the following:
• Development of 6 CFS Manuals (one for each CFS Dimension), each containing a series of Modules
linked to each indicator. The modules would explain the indicator/standard, expected behaviour and
provide a range of strategies that might be employed, with local examples, plus links to relevant
resources, or specific extracts of importance included as annexes. This will require drafting, trialling,
monitoring, documenting.
• That at least to one Manual – CFS Awareness, Policy, Planning, Management, Leadership, be
completed in 2009, building on existing resources/processes and develop others.
• That examples of CFS-related Good Practices or Guidelines be identified and documented for
inclusion in the manuals – for example, the World Vision supported ‘Girl Retrieval and Reading
Strategy’ in Makira; COPE developed ‘Code of Conduct’ for Teachers, etc.
• That CFS Reference Groups for each CFS pillar be established to provide quality guidance on the
development of CFS resources / processes, and ensure coordination with related efforts at national
level. That the CFS Reference groups include both provincial and national level stakeholders,
government and non-government - including representatives of key area, such as SICHE, curriculum,

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inspections, examinations, planning, chiefs, churches, youth, women, health, protection - as
appropriate to each pillar.
• That the Resource Kit include a set of posters for each dimension.
• That a set of rewriteable posters be produced containing school self-assessment templates for each
pillar, to enable mapping of school CF status, for display in the school office.
Recommendation R7: SICHE
That a process of alignment of CFS and School of Education Teacher Training programs be supported.
2.7
Supporting CFS Development Priorities Isabel
In the 2008 School Self Assessment process, school/communities indicated their priorities for CFS
development. Across the schools, a wide range of CFS indicators emerged as warranting further
development (see Attachment 7). Schools were asked to select their three top priorities (see
Attachment 3.2). The most common priorities across schools included the following:
Priority
No. of Schools
Possible Support
School-level CFS Policy Development- include in one 23 schools

of workshops training….
Water and Sanitation
23 schools
UNICEF , other
SMIS 10
schools
UNICEF
Child-Friendly Classroom Environments
8 schools
TBD
School Committee…include in one of workshops
5 schools

Library, Student Leadership, Community Participation
UNICEF
Community Support for / Access to Kindy-
Three schools

Safe School Environment- clarify



Recommendation R8: Consolidation of CFS in Isabel

That UNICEF an ‘end of year’ workshop be held with Isabel School and Community representatives to:
• review CFS development progress during 2009,
• establish priorities for 2010,
• trial the CFS Leadership manual (including policy development, data management, etc)
2.8
Expansion to Choiseul / Western
A senior stakeholder within MEHRD raised a query as to the intention behind introducing CFS to Western
and Choiseul in 2009, given the ‘potential’ for MEHRD to mainstream CFS and take it to all provinces in
2010. This confusion again suggests lack of clarity as to the CFS development and integration strategy.
On UNICEF side, funding has been secured from the EU to support activities in Choiseul and
Western as part of the post-tsunami rehabilitation process. Furthermore, Choiseul and Western are
UNICEF convergence zones where support from all UNICEF program areas will coincide to
maximise impact. Furthermore, the introduction of CFS to Choiseul / Western provinces in 2009
provides an opportunity to trial a CFS induction process, building on lessons learnt in Isabel, prior to
further expansion. In addition, it supports a ‘phased’ approach and reduces the complexity of
expanding to all other provinces simultaneously.
Lessons for CFS development gained in Isabel include: the need to provide CFS Awareness first, including
the rights of the child to education and the obligation of parents, communities, government and non-

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government partners to ensure this right is realised. In parallel with this should be school-community
mapping of exclusion and analysis of the same. This then can be followed by generation of a vision of a
‘child-friendly school’, emerging from local analysis of context. The school/community self-assessment and
identification of priorities and strategies for improvement will follow.

Recommendation R9: Expansion to Choiseul and Western Provinces
That UNICEF and MEHRD establish a common understanding with regard to CFS expansion strategy.
That, pending MEHRD endorsement, introduction of CFS to Choiseul and Western provinces commence in
June 2009 with a stakeholder awareness workshop and planning of a pilot school-community mapping
exercise.
That participants include: the PEO, SEO, NFE, ECE, church authorities, Education Board, other key
government and/or non-government partners representing health, protection, paralegal, etc.
That CFS stakeholders from Isabel Province (CFS Coordinator, NFE Officer and one Light-house Head
Teacher) assist the Western/Choiseul CFS Coordinator to conduct this workshop.
That a follow-up workshop be held in September, to:
• review the school-community mapping process and findings;
• to develop a CFS concept;
• to introduce the school self-assessment process.
That a final workshop be conducted in December to review the outcomes of the school self-assessment
pilot and to plan further development in 2010.

2.9
Other Emerging Issues
Pockets of Disadvantage in Honiara
The small-scale introduction /piloting of CFS within the Honiara City Council area was raised, given
significant pockets of severe disadvantage, including both children and teachers who suffered during the
period of conflict. Some schools are interested to map out-of-school children and to identify factors
contributing to educational disadvantage. Psycho-social counselling for teachers, plus training of teachers
to deliver the same to children may be required, if not other tailored interventions.
Integration of Older Children
Stakeholders identified a legal conflict in relation to the re-inclusion of ‘older hitherto-excluded children’. On
the one hand, there is a child-rights legal imperative to include these children. On the other hand, there is a
Solomon Is legislative imperative to continue to exclude them on the basis of age and class-size. This and
similar issues need to be considered in a broad stakeholder forum.
CFS Coordinators Isabel and Western / Choiseul
With regard to the new CFS Coordinators in Isabel and Choiseul/Western, clarification is required on:
• Terms of Appointment (duration, role/responsibilities, secondment status from TSC), working budget,
workplan, transport (canoe/motor), computer/internet access, training (computer), reporting
requirements, coordination meetings, housing.
3.
Proposed CFS Workplan Solomon Is 2009
The proposed workplan for CFS development in 2009 follows:


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Proposed CFS Workplan Solomon Is 2009



Focus - Activity

Month Visit
Mapping
Indicators / SSA
Planning
Expansion to
Develop Manual 1##
Duration
Choiseul/Western
1
April





2
May





3
June
3 wks –
Mapping wksps -Isabel
Review/revise CFS
Review implications of CFS for CFS Awareness Workshop –
CFS Audit x pre-service
School

indicators
national education system –
Choiseul & Western. Introduce: training - Plan CFS Resource
holidays

develop Integration Strategy
CFS concept, School Mapping– Package Development -
Examine integration of CFS
plan limited trial.
Map existing policy / resource
SSA and SDP.
links - Identify stories/case
studies to be collected
4
July
Implementation of


Trial implementation CFS
Manual development
5
August
school mapping – Isabel
awareness & school-
community mapping in Ch/W
6
September 2 wks -
Wkshp- review mapping
Final review/revise CFS Examine implications of CFS
Workshop to review outcomes
Review Manual development
SchHol
findings –examine
indicators
process Isabel for
of trial school-community
implications of barriers

mainstreaming in NEAP 2010-
mapping in Choiseul & Western
for CFS indicators/
2012

strategies & NEAP

Plan trial SSA /integration SDP
in limited number of schools
7
October



Trial SSA /integration SDP in
Manual development
8
November
limited number of schools
9
December 2 wks -

HT/School Committee
Workshop to review outcomes
Review Manual 1
SchHol
Chairperson wkshp Isabel to
of trial SSA / in Choiseul &
Plan development of CFS
review SDP implementation
Western –
Manuals in 2010
2009/ set priorities for 2010
Review process & plan further
expansion
• NB. National Census in November 2009 and Provincial Election in June in Western Province.




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Attachments


Attachment 1 CFS Development Diagram
Attachment 2 Extracts from NEAP
Attachment 3 Workshop Program March 2009
Attachment 4 Contact List
Attachment 5 Key Documents
Attachment 6 Summary of Isabel SSA Priorities (November 2008)
Attachment 7 Support Needed– Links to existing Resources
Attachment 8 UNICEF Support to CFS 2009
Attachment 9 Presentation: School of Education SICHE
Attachment 10 Presentation: SI Curriculum Reform, Curriculum Development Centre
Attachment 11 Quality Principles
Attachment 12 Quality Principles
Isabel CFS Self-Assessment Report 2008 (bound separately)


11

Att

achment 1
Survival
Protection
Development
Participation
PROGRAM GOAL: QUALITY BASIC EDUCATION FOR ALL
PROGRAM PURPOSE:
Monitoring
CFS
CHILD-FRIENDLY SCHOOLS
change:
leadership,
improvements
Inclusive,
planning,
in CFS status &
Gender-sensitive,
management
results for
Community
non-
Effective, child-
Healthy, health-
children
support &
discriminatory
centred
promoting &
teaching &
protective
participation
learning
PROJECT SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE:-
To develop effective strategies for building awareness and capacity, amongst key stakeholders, to plan, develop,
implement, monitor & sustain the progressive achievement of child-friendly schools

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Attachment 2 – Extracts from: National Education Action Plan (NEAP) 2007-2009

The Vision for Education described in the National Education Action Plan (NEAP)(2007-2009) is:
that all Solomon Islanders will develop as individuals and possess knowledge, skills and attitudes needed
to earn a living and to live in harmony with others and the environment. WE envisage a united and

progressive society in which all can live in peace and harmony with fair and equitable opportunities for a
better life. We envision an education and training system responsive to its clients and effectively managed

by its stakeholders. (NEAP, 2006, p.10).

The first of three Strategic Goals of NEAP are:
to provide equitable access to quality basic education for all children in the Solomon Islands

Basic Education is described in NEAP as:
‘the gradual, planned and systematic introduction of a child to the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary ‘to
prepare him or her to develop to his or her full potential in order to contribute fully to the community and to the

nation’.

According to NEAP (NEAP; P. 13) Basic Education :
is holistic - encompassing physical, mental, social and spiritual aspects of life,
basic skills and competencies required for economic activity and development
prepares a child to become self-reliant and responsible, a resourceful member in the community, and
promotes committed and responsible leadership
encourages a child to adhere to and respect religious, traditional and cultural values, beliefs, norms and
codes of conduct of the local community and the wider world.
provides the basis for a child to recognise and accept the diversity of Solomon Islands’ culture, tradition,
religion, and ethnicity throughout the Islands.
Thus, every child who is excluded from basic education, is denied all of the above skills, knowledge, attitudes
which are valued in Solomon Is today.
Thus, the important point is not so much that ‘access to education’ is the right of every child. More important is
that every child has the right to personal development and growth that results from education.
Thus – we need to keep in mind:-‘Inclusion’ – means not just ‘enrolment’ of all children, but:
Ensuring they attend regularly.
Ensuring they participate actively in wide range of curricular and extra-curricular learning activities
Ensuring teaching – learning strategies meet children’s individual learning needs
Ensuring they progress from grade to grade
Ensuring complete the basic education cycle, and, in doing so:
Ensuring they achieve full set of literacy, numeracy, life and social skills and knowledge that will enable
them to reach their full potential

A Child-Friendly School must identify those children who are excluded at any stage prior to
completion, analyse the contributing factors, and develop strategies to remove
these barriers to full participation in quality education.

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Attachment 3 – CFS Workshop Program March 2009

Purpose:


The purpose of the workshop is to:
1. Strengthen the concept of Child Friendly Schools (CFS) in improving the quality and relevance of
basic education in Western & Choiseul and Isabel provinces and to incorporate the CFS principles
into the teachers training and curriculum.
2. Jointly develop CFS standards for documentation at the National & Provincial levels.

Rational:

The Ministry of Education’s Strategic Plan, commits the government to providing a quality, relevant
education to all of its children. According to the Convention on the Rights of the Child’s (CRC) signed
by the Solomon Islands in 1995, the children of Western & Choiseul have the right to a quality
education that is inclusive, protective Healthy, child-centered, and gender responsive.

Objectives

To Review:
1. Status of CFS in SI – what is CFS? CFS development model, links to SI Education Strategic
Framework 2007-2015; roles and responsibilities; coordination with other partners; Quality
checklist & M&E framework
2. Progress to date in Isabel; CFS status, implications for support, lessons learnt for expansion
elsewhere
3. Plans for Expansion to Choisuel/Western – development of strategy and work plan;
4. Plans for Integration of CFS at national level (curriculum, teacher training; development of CFS
Manuals etc);
5. Specific Issues: ECE, School Libraries; Water/Health/Sanitation

Participants

1. Rep from curriculum(Name to be confirmed)
2. Rep from school of education(Name to be confirmed)
3. Rep from Planning & Coordination Unit
4. Benedict Esibaea, Director primary
5. Bernadine Haamori, ECE Department
6. Rep from RWSS(MHMS)
7. NEW CFS coordinator for Western & Choiseul province
8. NEW CFS coordinator for Isabel Province
9. PEO from Western Province
10. PEO from Isabel Province
11. PEO from Choisuel Province
12. REP from literacy Solomon Islands (LASI)
13. REP from Public Library









14

CFS Workshop Program – March 2009, Honiara

Monday 9th March:
Thursday 12th March ##
Friday 13th March

8:00-8:30 registration of
8.30 -9:00am
8:30- 9:30
participants
Brief overview of the Status of Primary
‘Hot Topics and Burning Issues’.

Education in Solomon Islands in terms
Discussion: issues of concern re CFS
Facilitator: Adi
of enrolment, retention, attendance,
development, including:
primary school completion rates (by
8:30 – 8:45 Official opening

gender), progression to secondary and
Welcome and review of objectives learning achievement.
CFS affordability?
& process

CFS added value?

Facilitator: Noelyn (MEHRD)
Mainstreaming CFS approach ?
Facilitator: Adi

CFS / MEHRD coordination
8:45- 9:15
MEHRD expectations from CFS
Global movement for children
9.00 - 9.30

UNICEF & Solomon Islands
School Development Planning Tools
Government’s role

and Processes:
The basic CRC principles
Facilitators: TBD
i) Overview of the new School

Development Plan Process & School
Facilitator: Nikhat
Grants ( Noelyn & Emma -MEHRD)




ii) Overview of CFS Indicators & SSA
process (Wryne & Ellison)

Discussion: How can SDP and CFS be
integrated?

9:30-10:am
9:30- 10:30
9:15 – 10:30
Status of the primary curriculum & ECE
1.Current status of Literacy rate in
Education Sector frame work
curriculum Development.
Solomon Islands and the organisation’s
Goals and how CFS links to this.
Facilitator: Linda, Curriculum Division &
contribution in improving the illiteracy

Bernadine (ECE Dept)
issue we have in the country
Facilitator: Wryne & Bernadine



Discussion: What are the existing
Facilitator: Rep from LASI (Literacy
features of the primary curriculum which
Association Solomon Islands)
are indicative of a CFS approach?

What are the gaps?
2. Current rate of children (primary

school age who are iliterate


Facilitator: Benedict

10:30- 10:45 MORNING TEA BREAK
10:45- 12:30
10:45-11:30am
10:45 – 12;30
Status of Child Friendly program
Current status of teachers in training
Process of developing Child Friendly
in Solomon Islands, priorities for
and trained teachers in Solomon Islands School Libraries in rural areas.
development, implications for


support
Facilitator: Stanley (TTDO)
Facilitator: Rep from the Public Library


& Wryne
Facilitator: Wryne & Adi
11:30 am -12:30am
Discussion
Status of teacher Education program for
Primary (pre-service & in-service) &
ECE

Facilitator from School of Education

12:30- 1:30 LUNCH BREAK

15

1:30 – 3:30 Presentation of
1.30 – 2:30
1:30 – 2:30:
findings from Isabel SSA process
Education Authorities &
Presentation on Water, Sanitation and hygiene
and current status on School CFS Stakeholders roles in CFS
school facility designs suitable for ECE &
and reflection on process.
development
primary schools in rural provinces and rural


urban areas.

Discussion: How can Education


Authorities be strengthened to
Facilitator: Rep from Heath & Sanitation
support CFS development ? How
Facilitator: Wryne & Karen

can CFS be institutionalized at

provincial level ??



Facilitator: Ellison, Roger, Dalcy

2.30-3.00
2:30 – 3:00:
What support is Unicef providing
Review ‘Quality Principles’ Guiding CFS
to the Solomon Islands that will
development
facilitate CFS development in
2009?

Facilitator: Nikhat

3.00 – 3.30
3.00-3.30
Review CFS development workplan for
Mapping Support required to
Solomon Is 2009 – Isabel, Choiseul/Western
achieve CFS standards-existing
and National level activities
resources & resource gaps –

PART 2 Group Feedback
Facilitator: Karen
3:30 – 3:45 AFTERNOON TEA BREAK
3:45 – 4:30
3:45 – 4:30 Support required to
3:45- 4:15 Session wrap up
Support required to achieve CFS
achieve CFS standards-

standards-implications for system
implications for system – PART 3
Recommendations and Follow-Up
Support/links to SI Ed. Sector
- Discussion

Developments – PART 1

Faciliator: Adi


Facilitator : Bernadine



4:15-4:30 Evaluation & closure
## During the Day on Thursday, participants contribute questions. Invite PS and Education Adviser.



16

Attachment 4– Workshop Participants

NAME POSITION
LOCATION EMAIL
Myline Kuve #
Permanent Secretary
MEHRD
mkuve@mehrd.gov.sb
Peter Potter #
Sector Adviser
MEHRD
inspectorate@mehrd.gov.sb
Audrey Rusa
Chief Secretary (Education)
MEHRD
secretariat@mehrd.gov.sb
Veronica Toben
Director, INspections
MEHRD

Benedict Esibaea
Director, Primary Education
MEHRD

Bernadine Ha’amori Director, Early Child Hood
MEHRD
bhaamori@hotmail.com
Mike Haukavia
Senior Education Officer,
MEHRD
mhaukaria@mehrd.gov.sb
Teacher Training Development

Curriculum Development
Linda
Centre
MEHRD

soe@siche.edu.sb
Suzanne Maezama
Head of School (Education)
SICHE

Oswald Bako
Director – Primary, SOE


Viola Malasa
Director – ECE, SOE

vmalasa@gmail.com
Wryne Bennett
Ex-CFS Project Officer
Isabel Province
wmbennett2002@yahoo.com
Ellison Mane
Principal Education Officer
Isabel Province
isaeducation@solomon.com.sb
Dorothy Bana
Jejevo Primary School
Isabel Province
isaeducation@solomon.com.sb
Daley Sito
Chief Education Officer
Western Province
Daley.sito@yahoo.com




Solomon Island National
Mary Susurua
SINTA
msusura@yahoo.com.au
Teachers Association

Caroline Laore
Program officer Gizo
UNICEF
Claore.unicef@gmail.com
Priscilla Maeniuta
Literacy Association Sol Is
LASI
training@solomon.com.sb
Miriam Johnstone
National Library

milianstone@live.com.au
* Met independently from workshop





17

Attachment 5 - Key Documents

School of Education, SICHE – Teacher Education Handbook 2009

Solomon Islands, Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development - Education Strategic
Framework 2007-2015
, DRAFT (revised November 8, 2006)

Solomon Islands, Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development - National Education
Action Plan 2007-2009
, DRAFT 3 (November 2006

UNICEF Pacific – Solomon Islands – A Situation Analysis of Children, Women and Youth 2005

UNICEF Pacific – Solomon Islands Child-Friendly Schools Project, Isabel Project. Project
Design Framework. July 2004

UNICEF Pacific –
Solomon Islands Child-Friendly Schools Project, Isabel Project. Report on
Consolidation and Expansion. January 2008

The Human Rights Based Approach to Development Cooperation: Towards a Common

Understanding Among the UN Agencies”, UNDG, May 2003

18

Attachment 6 - Summary of Isabel SSA Priorities – Draft (November 2008)

1 - LEADERSHIP, PLANNING, MANAGEMENT
Priorities
Support Needed
1.1
School Committee
√√√√√
Manual – roles/responsibilities / Training
1.2
School CFS Policy
√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√
Examples of Good Practice
1.3
Child-Friendly School Development Plan

Training to integrate to SDP
1.4
Administrative & Operational Policy Statements

Extract from existing documents
1.5 Effective
School
administration

TTDO Leadership/management training
1.6
Effective Resource Management

TTDO training
1.7 Financial
Management

TTDO training
1.8
School Management Information System (SMIS)
√√√√√√√√√√
Training - UNICEF
1.9
Effective Parent / Teacher Association

Community Awareness
1.10
Teacher Motivation to Change / Ownership or

Training to build capacity
1.11 Effective
School
Leadership

TTDO Leadership/management training
1.12
Student Leadership
√√√
Continuous coaching – learn from good practices
PILLAR 2 - COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS
Priorities
Support Needed
2.1
School/ Community Partnership
√√
Community Awareness
2.2
Effective school – community communication

Regular PTA meetings
2.3
Community Knowledge re CFS

Community Awareness
2.4
Community Leadership / Mobilisation / for CFS

Community Awareness consultations
2.5
Community participation in CFS development
√√√
Community Awareness consultations
2.6
School/ home communication on Student Progress


2.7
Parents value education and support for student


2.8
Integration local values, customs, relevance

Community Awareness consultations
2.9
Effective community support for kindy
√√√
ECE Policy
2.10
Community Involvement in School Committee


2.11
Community Involvement in Financial Management

Training
2.12
Awareness / Participation Community Women

Mother’s Union Awareness
PILLAR 3 -INCLUSIVE & GENDER-RESPONSIVENESS
Priorities
Support Needed
3.1
School Policy on Inclusive Education

Review Data – Develop Guideline -Training
3.2
Access to Primary Schools

Extension Schools
3.3
Primary Extension Schools


3.4
Annual enrolment projection / campaign

Budget for Data Collection
3.5
Inclusive Curriculum

Resource Inventory
3.6
Equality in Access to Kindy
√√√
ECE Awareness
3.7

Reduction of Drop-Outs
Parent Awareness; community support; community
mapping & monitoring
3.8
Elimination of Exclusion due to Poverty

Mapping Exclusion
3.9
Inclusive Teaching / Learning Practice

Teacher Training
3.10
Monitoring Absenteeism

SMIS Training-Stakeholder Dialogue
3.11
Special Needs Education

Teacher Training; revised curriculum
3.12
Respect for Difference


3.13
Inclusive Student Leadership (duplicates 1.12)



19

PILLAR 4 HEALTHY, SAFE & PROTECTIVE
Priorities
Support Needed
4.1
School Health Promotion Policies

Guideline on Health Policy – collaboration MOH
4.2
School Cleaning / Waste Disposal

Skill Development – Collaboration authorities
4.3
Safe School Environment
√√√
Toolkit, Policy, Guideline
4.4
School Water & Sanitation
√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√√
Resolution land issues
4.5
Food Security Storage and Nutrition

Policy, System for Food Storage / Preservation; PTA
work closely with community
4.6
Functional Pleasant School Environment
√√
Awareness of need and possibilities; PTA work
closely with community
4.7
School Ethos (Climate)

Awareness of need and possibilities
4.8
Physical Education / Sport

Review curriculum,Books, sports equipment
4.9
Routine Health Checks & First Aid

Partnership with Clinics / nurses
4.10
Health / Protection Partnerships

Establish CFS Steering Committee; Tool Kit
4.11
Health & Life Skills Curriculum

Curriculum, Resources, Training
4.12
Healthy, Safe Boarding Facilities

Renovation of Facilities; Legislation; Standards
4.13
Teachers’ Behaviour Promotes Health, Safety,

Teacher Training
4.14
Community knowledge of health, safety, protection

Community Awareness / training
4.15
Specific Health / Safety for Girls

Guideline & Training
PILLAR 5 - CHILD-CENTRED TEACHING & LEARNING
Priorities
Support Needed
5.1
Child-centred Lesson Planning

Teacher Training
5.2
Relevant Inclusive Child-centred Curriculum

Integrate CFS in CDC- CDC awareness
5.3
Teaching / Learning Resources

Teacher Training x local materials development
5.4
Child-centred teaching/ learning approaches
√√√
Integrate CFS in SOE, SICHE- CDC awareness
5.5
Assessment of Student Performance

In-service student assessment – Assessment Policy
5.6 SMIS


Evaluation of SMIS
5.7
Teacher Knowledge Child-centred Teaching/

In-service training on new curriculum / resources
√√√√√√√√
Renovate classrooms; Resource materials, teachers
5.8
Child-friendly classrooms / teaching-learning
environment

trained
√√√
Books, storeage, furniture, library management
5.9
School Library
training
5.10 Teacher
Professionalism

Training and awareness
5.11
School Climate

PILLAR MONITORING CHANGE
Priorities
Support Needed
6
6.1
Establishing Base-line

Indicators, Self-assessment training
6.2 Setting
Targets

Involvement x all stakeholders
6.3 CFS
Monitoring
Plan


6.4
Monitoring Outcomes for Children


6.5
Monitoring CFS Improvement


6.6
Monitoring Capacities Built


6.7
Monitoring Support Provided for CFS Development



20

Attachment 7 - Summary of CFS Support Needs and Links to Existing Resources – Working Draft

PILLAR 1- EFFECTIVE CFS LEADERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, POLICY, PLANNING

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12
CFS
Admin &
Effective
Effective
School
Parent /
Teacher
School
School
Financial Managem’nt
Teacher
School
Student
CFS Process Indicator
Development Operational School
Resource
Motivation/
Committee
Policy
Plan
Info System
Procedures
Admin Management Management
Associatio
Leadership
Leadership
(SMIS)
Ownership
n
Support Needed #












TTDO:
Existing Resources # /










Sch.Leadership/

Links
Management
Training

PILLAR 2- COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS & LOCAL RELEVANCE
Code
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
Effective
Community
Community
School –home
Parents
Integration
School/
school –
Community
Community
Community
Participatio
Community
Leadership/
participatio
communicatio support for
local
Involvement
n
Indicator
Community
community
Knowledge
n in CFS
support for
n on Student
student
values,
Involvement
Partnership
communicat
re CFS
Mobilisation
in School
Community
developmen
customs,
kindy
in Financial
ion
for CFS
Progress
education
Committee
Women
t
relevance

Support Needed










#


Existing
BELS










Resources# /
Community
Links
Support/Part
nership
Resource
Book –
FIND COPY



21


PILLAR 3 - INCLUSION, EQUALITY & GENDER-RESPONSIVENESS
Code
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
School
Elimination
Special
Respect
Access to
Primary
Annual
Inclusive
Inclusive
Policy on
enrolment
Inclusive
Equality in
Reduction
of
Teaching /
Monitoring
Needs
for
Gender-
Indicator
Primary
Extension
Curriculu
Access to
of Drop-
Student
Inclusive
Exclusion
Education
Difference
Schools Schools
projection/
Learning
Absenteeism
Inclusion
m
Kindy
Outs
Leadership
Education
campaign
due to
Practice
Poverty
Support Needed #














Existing Resources/


Links













PILLAR 4 - HEALTHY, HEALTH-PROMOTING, SAFE & PROTECTIVE
Code
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.40
4.11
4.12
4.13
School
School
Food
Functional
Routine
Health &
Healthy,
Teachers’ as
Cleaning /
Safe School
School
School
Physical
Health /
Life Skills
Safe
Indicator
Health
Environ’t/
Security
Pleasant
Health
Role Models
Promotion
Waste
Water &
Ethos
Education /
Protection Curriculum
Boarding
classrooms
Storage
School
Checks &
Health,Safety,
Policies
Disposal
Sanitation
/Nutrition
(Climate)
Environment
Sport
First Aid
Partnerships
Facilities
Protection
Support Needed #













Existing
Pacific

Resources #
Infrastructu
Stars Life


re







Skills

standards-


22


PILLAR 5 EFFECTIVE INCLUSIVE CHILD-CENTRED TEACHING & LEARNING
Code
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12


Relevant
Child-
Teacher
Teacher
School

Inclusive
Child-
Child-
centred
Teaching /
Assessment
SMIS
Knowledge
School
Professionalism
Climate –
Indicator
Child-
centred
Learning
of Student
friendly


Lesson
/ Skills of
positive,
centred
Library
Resources
teaching/

classrooms
Planning
Performance
Inclusive
nurturing
Curriculum
learning
Teaching/
Training
Support
teachers
SICHE
Teacher ed
Evaluation
Teacher
Repair
Suitable
Monitoring,

Needed #
Incorporation
curriculum
programs –
of SMIS –
resource
classrooms
books
Training of
evaluation,
Training
CC in
development
to include
pre/in-service
– resource
Room
reporting


curriculum
local
– revision
SMIS
books /
teachers –
materials /
CCTL
materials-
Library
SMIS
training
guides
textbooks
approach
training
training
Existing
Primary
Assessment
UNICEF
Teaching Service
CFS

Resources
SICHE.
Environment
Curriculum
curriculum
SMIS
Make use
policy in
CDC &
resources
Handbook Teacher Coordinator
#/enabling
DFL start
in place
full of natural
in place-
resoures
own


place –
SICHE
for books
training policies in
conditions
2009
resources
need EDE
SPBEA
available
resources
place
curriculum
PRIDE

PILLAR 6 - MONITORING CHANGE, LEARNING, FEEDBACK, ACTION
Code
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7

Monitoring
Monitoring
Indicator
Establishing
Setting Targets
CFS
Inclusion &
Monitoring CFS
Monitoring
Base-line
Monitoring Plan
Outcomes for
Improvement
Capacities Built
Support Provided

Children
for CFS
Support Needed #
ECE & Primary to
Indicators & training
All stakeholders to
Budget & plans of
take CFS

on self-assessment
be involved..
where to go


Budget, workplan
development as
part of work
program
Existing Resources /
Enabing Conditions
SIEMIS /SMIS
NAP / PAP existing Isabel example &
community
policies in various
SMIS – Isabel
Isabel model

Guidelines CFS
ECE / Primary

guideline
stages completion
personnel
Manual
already aware


23

Attachment 8
UNICEF Support for Child Friendly Schools Solomon Is
Annual Workplan Targets 2009

CFS Dimensions
Level of Support
Capacity Building Resources & Processes
National & Provincial Level
School-Community Level
1. Leaderrship,
School based planning
Apply CFS
SEMIS, PAF data collected,
SSA, SDP)introduced to 50% of primary schools in
Policy, Planning
& monitoring tools
Standards at
collated utilized and monitored
Western and Choiseul Provinces.
national &

(SSA, SDP)
at provincial level for Isabel,
Develop CFS
provincial
SMIS training module introduced to at least 30%
Western & Choiseul provinces
Standards
levels
schools in Western and Choiseul Provinces Stocktake of
provincial level administrators in
student record keeping practices by teachers
utilization, interpretation and
presentation of education data
2. Community
Develop CFS

Apply CFS

Support participation of School Committees/Boards in
Partnerships
Standards
Standards
school planning and management processes in three
Provinces
3. Inclusive &
Develop CFS

Apply CFS

Support post-Tsunami school rehabilitation Ch/W
Gender
Standards
Standards
UNICEF Mapping of Children with Disabilities
Responsive
Barriers to Education Study
School-Community Mapping – I/W/Ch
4. Health, Safety,
Develop CFS
Life Skills benchmarks
Apply CFS
Design Water, Sanitation and
Support Water & Sanitation in 3 provinces Support
Protection
Standards
for basic education
Standards
Hygiene school facility
hygiene and health education initiatives
(yr4,6)
5.Teaching &
Develop CFS
DevelopAwareness
Apply CFS
Stocktake of assessment
Supply CFS school libraries x 3 provinces
Leaarning
Standards
raising campaign on
Standards
practices by teachers
Awareness Raising campaign on national literacy &
national literacy targets

numeracy targets

Training teachers on student assessment
Teacher training on Multi-grade – Ch/W
6. Participatory
Develop CFS

Apply CFS
Monitor CFS activities

Monitoring Change
Standards
Standards

24

UNICEF Annual workplan includes the following related activities that will contribute to creation of ‘enabling
environment’ for CFS development:

• Study on Barriers to Education (Inclusion)
• Post Tsunami Emergency Education (Inclusion) (???)
• Reconstruction of Schools Post-Tsunami (Choiseul and Western) (Inclusion)
• Mapping of Children with Disabilities (Inclusion) (link to Barrier study)
• Review SMIS in Isabel - Introduce SMIS into Choiseul and Western (Inclusion)SPBEA
• Development of National Language Policy (Teaching and Learning )ongoing
• Establishing National Literacy, Numeracy Targets (Teaching and Learning)SPBEA
• ECE Teacher Training: Curriculum (Teaching and Learning)
• Stocktake Student Assessment and Record-Keeping Processes (Teaching and Learning)SPBEA
• Teacher-Training: Assessment – Isabel (Teaching and Learning)SPBEA
• Teacher Training: Multigrade – Ch & West.(Teaching and Learning) SICHE
• Strengthening of School Committees (Community Partnership & School Management)
• Support School Water and Sanitation (Health, Safety, Protection)
• Health and Hygiene Education (Health, Safety, Protection)
• Development of Life Skills Benchmarks – Grades 4 and 6 (Health, Safety, Protection)SPBEA
• School Self-Assessment and School Development Planning (Planning)
• CFS Standards (Planning)
• Collection of SIEMIS / PAF Data (Planning)
• CFS Manual Development (Planning)
• Capacity Building of Provincial Administrators in utilisation, interpretation, presentation of education data
(Provincial Planning) SPBEA


























25

Attachment 9

Presentation: School of Education SICHE
VISION: To educate teachers to make a positive difference to Solomon Islands Schools

GOALS
1.
To provide quality, evidenced-based teaching
2.
To assist students to become independent , enquiring and creative lifelong learners & practitioners
3.
To enhance staff capability as teachers, researchers and learners
4.
To develop a research culture
5.
To develop strong external professional partners

STRATEGIES
Continuous review & evaluation incorporating student feedback, peer observation, external comment.
Benchmarking
Ensuring students know how to access and analyse information
Ensuring students learn to become reflective teachers who marry theory and practice in the classroom
Teaching students to respect others and value their pupils as individuals
Provide conditions for personal and professional growth in a collegial atmosphere
Supporting professional development
Sharing, analysing and acting to address problems of practice
Sharing and using research findings
Encouraging staff study for higher qualifications
Promoting joint/combined investigations into practice in the Solomon Islands
Supporting publication of investigation
Work with MEHRD and CDC over educational policy and its implementation
Develop relations with principals of practicum schools
Networking with subject specialists, principals’ groups CDC
Maintaining contact with alumni – graduates of the SOE
Maintaining internet contacts

NEW TEACHER EDUCATION QUALIFICATIONS
Four new diploma qualifications are being introduced.
These qualifications have been developed over a period of two and a half years (2006-2009).
Both the structure of the qualifications and the content of the courses have been radically changed,
improved and updated.
This means that the quality of teacher education at the School of Education, SICHE has been
significantly raised and is now comparable with the best practice teacher education elsewhere in the
world.


26

COURSES
At either Level 100 or at Level 200.
Some courses are taught across all the different programmes of study, for example, Human
Development.
Other courses are specific to a particular programme – eg. some of the early childhood courses.
Usually, but not always, Level 100 courses will be taken in the first year of study and Level 200
courses in the second year of study.
Level 200 courses require students to study at a higher level.

DIPLOMA IN TEACHING ECE COURSE PROFILE

Semester A 2009
LA140A: Preparation for Tertiary Learning
ES100A: Professional Studies 1
ES107A: Fundamentals of ECE
ES109A: Historical, Local & International Perspectives of ECE
LA144A: Language, Literacy & Comm.
SS115A: Children’s Wellbeing
Semester B 2009
TE101: Teaching Experience 1
ES102B: Human Development
LA132B: Expressive Arts
SC232B: Making Sense of the World
Total courses for Year: 10
Total Credit Points: 120
Semester A 2010
ES200: Professional Studies 2
ES203: Curriculum and Assessment
SS215: Belonging and Contribution
SEMESTER B, 2010
TE201B:Teaching Experience 2
ES204: Transition to School
ES110: ECE/Primary Religious Education
ES106: Educational Leadership, Mana & Ad
ES104: Introduction to Special Education and inclusive Practices
Option
Total courses for Year: 9; Total Credit Points: 120; Total for DTchg ECE :240

27


CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY
Te Whariki – Early childhood curriculum, New Zealand Bicultural Curriculum.
Founded on the following aspirations for children:
to grow as competent and confident learners and communicators, healthy in mind, body, and spirit,
secure in their sense of belonging and in the knowledge that they make a valued contribution to
society. (Ministry of Education, Learning Media Wellington, 1996)


With Principles of
Empowerment

-
Whakamana
The early childhood curriculum empowers the child to learn and grow.
Holistic Development
-
Kotahitanga
The early childhood curriculum reflects the holistic way children learn and grow.
Family and Community
-
Whanau Tangata
The wider world of family and community is an integral part of the early childhood curriculum
Relationships - Nga
Hononga
Children learn through responsive and reciprocal relationships with people, places, and things.
And the five Strands of:
Well-being
-
Mana Atua
The health and well-being of the child are protected and nurtured
Belonging
- Mana
Whenua
Children and their families feel a sense of belonging.
Contribution - Mana
Tangata
Opportunity for learning is equitable, and each child’s contribution is valued
Communication
-
Mana
Reo
The language and symbols of their own and other cultures are promoted and protected.
Exploration - Mana
Aoturoa
The child learns through active exploration of the environment.

3 Key Theorists
Piaget (1896-1970) A Swiss biologist
“Children actively construct their own learning through activities.”
Believes that the child explores, imitates and repeats things for a purpose.
The mind of a child does not stand still. It is a bit like a seesaw. On one ends are the new things that
the child absorbs. At the other end of the seesaw new information is moved around to see how it can
be fitted into the knowledge the child already has.



28

Lev Seminovich Vygostky (1896-1934) A Russian anthropologist.
Importance on social interaction – the child being shaped, encouraged and even defined by those
who cared for and played with the child.
Learning needs support, guidance, and modelling to make it happen.
‘Scaffolding’ a meaningful experience for a child, where experts (who are usually adults but can also
be peers or older children) will encourage children to do as much for themselves as possible but will
stay involved (may be just keeping a watchful eye, or may be having direct input) to ensure the

success of the experience.
Urie Bronfenbrenner (1917).
The child learns within a ‘context’ which he describes as the child’s ‘ecology’.
Children, are shaped by their experiences within their family and their cultural and social networks
which are, in turn, influents by events and ideas at national and international level.
Children develop by having warm close relationships especially with a person or persons who have an
enduring, irrational involvement and commitment in care and joint activity with the child.
Centred on the child is the main initiator of his/her learning with the guidance of a capable and caring
individual
Quality programmes /Management & Administration
Quality environment for children (conducive, relevant classroom, resourceful, )
Quality interaction and care
Quality teacher (creativity in teaching and learning)
Building relationship with parents/guardian

What are the Gaps?

Possible links between SOE, Education Ministry, UNICEF

Educational awareness (Community involvement and participation)
Funding (Resources)
Communication links


29

Attachment 10

Presentation: SI Curriculum Reform, Curriculum Development Centre

What is involved in the curriculum reform?

1. Formulate aims that encompass current trends and expectations.
2. Review and redesign syllabuses.
3. Adopt an approach that supports the achievement of curriculum aims.
4. The development and production of interactive curriculum resources.
5. Develop and implement effective in-service & pre-service resources and training.


What are the current trends and expectations?
They are stated as aims in the
National Education strategic Plans,
National Education Action Plan
Education Strategic Framework
Basic Education Policy

These documents express or state the same ideals.

Solomon Islands curriculum principals:

Cultural and social values, traditions and beliefs.
Controversial issues
Environmental and health education
Practical skills
Inclusive curriculum
Safety
Learning and teaching with a practical focus
Literacy and numeracy

Key Learning Areas


Culture promotion

Lifelong learning

Ethics and good citizenship

Technology

Entrepreneurship

Personal, Social and Health development

Controversial and sensitive issues

Review and redesigning of syllabuses

Adopting the Outcomes Based Education (OBE) approach.
The emphasis in the OBE approach is that learners should acquire knowledge, understanding,
skills, values and attitudes which will be useful to learners later in life as adults.


30

The process of developing an OBE curriculum involves:
Deciding the outcomes we want learners to achieve while they are at school.
Deciding the best methods by which outcomes can be achieved.

How does the curriculum support and promote the Child Friendly School initiative?

By adopting a Learner-centre approach.
Providing high quality, interactive curriculum materials.
Increasing learners’ accessibility to materials by providing enough textbooks.
It is culturally and contextually relevant to learners.
Gender balance oriented.
Promotes personal identity.
Addresses the diversity issue.
Involves families and communities.
Promotes awareness in learners about their rights as children and as human beings.
Applies a holistic approach that develops all aspects of a child – mental, social, physical and
spiritual.

By adopting the OBE approach, our curriculum acknowledges:
A belief in the capacity of all children to learn.
That learners have multi-intelligences and different potentials.
A commitment to provide equal opportunities for all learners to have access to basic education.
The importance of developing and implementing a learner-focused curriculum.
The need for learners to acquire relevant knowledge and skills for real life after school.




Thank you

31

Attachment 11

The Human Rights Based Approach to Development Cooperation
-Towards a Common Understanding Among UN Agencies3
Introduction
The United Nations is founded on the principles of peace, justice, freedom and human rights. The Universal
Declaration of Human Rights recognizes human rights as the foundation of freedom, justice and peace. The
unanimously adopted Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action states that democracy, development, and
respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms are interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

In the UN Programme for Reform that was launched in 1997, the Secretary-General called on all entities of the
UN system to mainstream human rights into their various activities and programmes within the framework of
their respective mandates.

Since then a number of UN agencies have adopted a human rights-based approach to their development
cooperation and have gained experiences in its operationalization. But each agency has tended to have its
own interpretation of approach and how it should be operationalized. However, UN interagency collaboration
at global and regional levels, and especially at the country level in relation to the CCA and UNDAF processes,
requires a common understanding of this approach and its implications for development programming. What
follows is an attempt to arrive at such an understanding on the basis of those aspects of the human rights-
based approach that are common to the policy and practice of the UN bodies that participated in the
Interagency Workshop on a Human Rights based Approach in the context of UN reform 3-5 May, 2003.

This Statement of Common Understanding specifically refers to a human rights based approach to the
development cooperation and development programming by UN agencies.

Common Understanding
1. All programmes of development co-operation, policies and technical assistance should further the
realisation of human rights as laid down in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other
international human rights instruments.
2. Human rights standards contained in, and principles derived from, the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights and other international human rights instruments guide all development cooperation
and programming in all sectors and in all phases of the programming process.
3. Development cooperation contributes to the development of the capacities of ‘duty-bearers’ to meet
their obligations and/or of ‘rights-holders’ to claim their rights.

1. All programmes of development co-operation, policies and technical assistance should further the
realisation of human rights as laid down in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other
international human rights instruments.
A set of programme activities that only incidentally contributes to the realization of human rights does not
necessarily constitute a human rights-based approach to programming. In a human rights-based approach to
programming and development cooperation, the aim of all activities is to contribute directly to the realization
of one or several human rights.

3 *Developed at the Inter-Agency Workshop on a human rights-based approach in the context of UN reform, 3 to 5 May 2003.


32

2. Human rights standards contained in, and principles derived from, the Universal Declaration of Human
Rights and other international human rights instruments guide all development cooperation and
programming in all sectors and in all phases of the programming process.
Human Rights principles guide programming in all sectors, such as: health, education, governance, nutrition,
water and sanitation, HIV/AIDS, employment and labour relations and social and economic security. This
includes all development cooperation directed towards the achievement of the Millennium Development
Goals and the Millennium Declaration. Consequently, human rights standards and principles guide both the
Common Country Assessment and the UN Development Assistance Framework.

Human rights principles guide all programming in all phases of the programming process, including
assessment and analysis, programme planning and design (including setting of goals, objectives and
strategies); implementation, monitoring and evaluation.
Among these human rights principles are: universality and inalienability; indivisibility; interdependence and
inter-relatedness; non-discrimination and equality; participation and inclusion; accountability and the rule of
law. These principles are explained below.
Universality and inalienability: Human rights are universal and inalienable. All people everywhere in
the world are entitled to them. The human person in whom they inhere cannot voluntarily give them
up. Nor can others take them away from him or her. As stated in Article 1 of the UDHR, “All human
beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights”.

Indivisibility: Human rights are indivisible. Whether of a civil, cultural, economic, political or social
nature, they are all inherent to the dignity of every human person. Consequently, they all have equal
status as rights, and cannot be ranked, a priori, in a hierarchical order.
Inter-dependence and Inter-relatedness. The realization of one right often depends, wholly or in part,
upon the realization of others. For instance, realization of the right to health may depend, in certain
circumstances, on realization of the right to education or of the right to information.
Equality and Non-discrimination: All individuals are equal as human beings and by virtue of the
inherent dignity of each human person. All human beings are entitled to their human rights without
discrimination of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, ethnicity, age, language, religion, political or
other opinion, national or social origin, disability, property, birth or other status as explained by the
human rights treaty bodies.
Participation and Inclusion: Every person and all peoples are entitled to active, free and meaningful
participation in, contribution to, and enjoyment of civil, economic, social, cultural and political
development in which human rights and fundamental freedoms can be realized.
Accountability and Rule of Law: States and other duty-bearers are answerable for the observance
of human rights. In this regard, they have to comply with the legal norms and standards
enshrined in human rights instruments. Where they fail to do so, aggrieved rights-holders are
entitled to institute proceedings for appropriate redress before a competent court or other adjudicator
in accordance with the rules and procedures provided by law.
3. Programmes of development cooperation contribute to the development of the capacities of duty-
bearers to meet their obligations and of ‘rights-holders’ to claim their rights.
In a HRBA human rights determine the relationship between individuals and groups with valid claims (rights-
holders) and State and non-state actors with correlative obligations (duty- bearers). It identifies rights-holders
(and their entitlements) and corresponding duty-bearers (and their obligations) and works towards
strengthening the capacities of rights-holders to make their claims, and of duty-bearers to meet their
obligations.



33

Implications of A Human Rights Based Approach to Development Programming of UN Agencies

Experience has shown that the use of a human rights-based approach requires the use of good programming
practices. However, the application of “good programming practices” does not by itself constitute a human
rights-based approach, and requires additional elements.

The following elements are necessary, specific, and unique to a human rights-based approach:

a) Assessment and analysis in order to identify the human rights claims of rights-holders and the
corresponding human rights obligations of duty-bearers as well as the immediate, underlying, and
structural causes of the non-realization of rights.
b) Programmes assess the capacity of rights-holders to claim their rights, and of duty-bearers to fulfill
their obligations. They then develop strategies to build these capacities.
c) Programmes monitor and evaluate both outcomes and processes guided by human rights standards
and principles.
d) Programming is informed by the recommendations of international human rights bodies and
mechanisms.

Other elements of good programming practices that are also essential under a HRBA, include:


1. People are recognized as key actors in their own development, rather than passive recipients of
commodities and services. (Local ownership)
2. Participation is both a means and a goal. (Participation)
3. Strategies are empowering, not disempowering. (Empowerment)
4. Both outcomes and processes are monitored and evaluated.(Process & outcome M&E)
5. Analysis includes all stakeholders. (Inclusive)
6. Programmes focus on marginalized, disadvantaged, and excluded groups.(Rights realization)
7. The development process is locally owned. (Local ownership)
8. Programmes aim to reduce disparity.(Disparity Reduction)
9. Both top-down and bottom-up approaches are used in synergy.(Interactive planning)
10. Situation analysis is used to identity immediate, underlying, and basic causes of development

problems. (Responsive to context)
11. Measurable goals and targets are important in programming. (Realistic targets)
12. Strategic partnerships are developed and sustained. (Partnerships)
13. Programmes support accountability to all stakeholders. (Accountability)



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Attachment 12
QUALITY PRINCIPLES UNDERPINNING CFS DEVELOPMENT
Overarching human-rights-based approach
Identification of children whose rights to quality education are denied - Identification of contributing factors
Development of strategies to overcome constraints –
Assessment of the capacity of stakeholders and education system to support CFS development
Implementation of capacity building program including integration of CFS in education system
Monitor and evaluate both quality of processes & outcomes achieved guided by human rights standards and principles.
Accountability
Through demonstration of quality of processes implemented & results achieved
Alignment with National Priorities
Both ensuring NEAP Priorities are integrated in CFS model and identifying CFS-related gaps within NEAP
Disparity Reduction
Major focus on the most vulnerable, disadvantaged, excluded (children, schools, communities) & responding accordingly
Local Relevance: Responsiveness to Context–
CFS development based on analysis of local constraints to inclusive quality education (school/community mapping)
Supporting school/community CFS self-assessment, planning – tailoring support to locally-identified priorities
Gender- Sensitivity
Gender-responsiveness integrated in CFS conceptual framework - Ensuring gender disaggregation of all data with analysis of the
same - Ensuring adequate representation of men and women in CFS development activities
Local Ownership & Broad Participation
Adopting strategies that explicitly seek to involve and empower school & community stakeholders to work in partnership to locally
plan, implement and monitor school improvement - Facilitating a participatory process to develop CFS vision
Fostering Partnerships: Coordination & Collaboration with multiple stakeholders
Involving all relevant stakeholders in CFS development – building partnerships across ministries, between national, provincial & local
levels, between government and non-government stakeholders, between school and communities
Simplicity
Working to ensure terminology/language and processes are as simple as possible
Training Resources to be appropriately designed for environments of limited reading & significant oral/aural traditions
Interactive Planning
Promoting a combination of top-down and bottom-up planning
Integration & Institutionalisation
Examination of the ‘child-friendliness’ of existing education systems policy, plans, processes – development & implementation of
integration strategy.
Results-based Approach
Participatory development of a clearly defined realistic Results Framework –Aligning activities supported to results targeted
Being realistic about results targeted given available resources – phasing and prioritising
Progressive monitoring of the quality of and relationships between processes and results
M&E, Continuous Improvement, Information Sharing
Development of comprehensive M&E plan at the outset - Establishing baseline data
Promoting participatory approach - Including multiple methods & perspectives
Progressively document good practices at school/community level& disseminate widely
Capacity Building and Empowerment
Major emphasis on capacity building (individual and institutional), ‘development of CFS Resource Package
Capacity building will be supported by participatory approach, training, teacher exchanges, amongst other

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